Saturday secret service psychologist: come play my mind game

More post-card philosophy for you!

We’re taking a darker shade today  to paint this fellow. Try to guess who said all this, you’ve definitely heard of him.

He is probably an INTJ. There is no consensus on his personality, but INTJ makes sense to me – clever, daring and ruthless! Put your guess in the comments and then Google any quote to get the actual answer. He said:

  • One must renounce the bad taste of wishing to agree with many people.
  • Morality is the herd instinct in the individual.
  • The visionary denies the truth to himself, the liar only to others.
  • One chooses logical argument only when one has no other means.
  • Convictions are more dangerous foes of truth than lies.
  • Without the errors which lie in the assumption of morality, man would have remained an animal.
  • All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking.
  • All credibility, all good conscience, all evidence of truth come only from the senses.
  • Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings – always darker, emptier and simpler.
  • The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.
  • In everything one thing is impossible: rationality.
  • The doer alone learneth.

Wishing you a wonderful weekend.

10 Comments Add yours

  1. V.J. says:

    Didn’t recognize any of the quotes, but definitely enjoyed them.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Anony Mole says:

    Easy to search. I was wondering if you gave us a choice of say, five similar alternatives. To pull from our personal histories the names of deep thinkers — well, I no learned individual and would know few, but I might guess the truth from a offering of names…

    • Thoughts are the shadows of our feelings – always darker, emptier and simpler.
    (liked that one)

    • The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.
    (that one I sent to my college age son)

    -Thanks

    (Guess? Orwell? Darwin? Muir? Churchill? — I have no idea…)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a great idea actually! I will make it a poll – and find a way to reveal the real answer without a spoiler!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That a great summary. Indeed, there is lots of evidence for it. I wonder though – my current walking habit involves listening to music: I wonder if that is sabotaging the benefits.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Anony Mole says:

        It might. Unless it’s wordless music. Or if you need it to block out the sounds of a city. I’m fortunate to have a nice “woods” near me, along with a quiet residential neighborhood with hills.

        Like

      3. Yes, it takes a lot effort to not go into a day dream!

        Like

      4. Anony Mole says:

        Well, wait a minute. That’s the point. One’s legs are the pumps that drive the brain’s idea engine. If you’re NOT day dreaming while you walk (if alone), then I’d say you’re doing it wrong.
        I often walk with a neighbor and we have the most engaging conversations; talks we’d never have sitting in a living room or on a bus. All brought on by expanse of landscape and woodscape that distracts the eyes letting the mind free-wheel without intentional stimulation. The eyes are such selfish things; let them be occupied with chaos (the beach, a campfire, a cloudscape) and the mind gets to ignore them for a while.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Good point. During my mindfulness exploits, I forgot that day dreaming can actually be useful!

        Like

      6. Anony Mole says:

        For a writer, daydreaming, mental wandering, letting the mind automagically create content, is a requirement. The last thing I want to do when I walk is to be mindful — unless I’m being the naturalist or geologist pointing out to a child features of the world I find fascinating.

        Liked by 1 person

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